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environment. now, people are a lot more positive about the u.s., so they're overweighting the u.s. the s. is still ary, very strong mark so many overweight that. and we're seeing a lot of regions like europe where investors are pretty much hands-off. so it depends, really, when you ask about how investors behave, where they come from, what region they're located in, and what region they invest in. european investors are, i would say, largely sitting on the sidelines. >> i'm going to come back to you in a moment. but let me ask you first about what's going on in the united states. a big debate about when the federal reserve is going to start winding down the stimulus. is there a downside risk to all of this free money, whether you look at what the fed has been doing with qe or what japan has been doing in terms of the stimulus there, the ecb as well. >> well, yes, it's very clear that central banks have been playing a very dominant role in the economy over the last couple of years. when i was at the imf meetings but still in davos, the talk was the central banks are still the only game in
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
a little bit. the analyst at deutsche bank said considering this macro environment chipolte might not want to do that so quickly. there is so much competition in share of your stomach pace, right with burger king, panera, and mcdonald's. they are all doing restaurant innovations and menu changes appeal to customers who are watching their every penny. back to you. david: thanks, lauren. have a good weekend. liz: the burrito bowl is popular item at fox business because they're just across the street. >>> major airlines in america have a new destination and that is federal court. david: they're suing the government. they're hoping to head off expected big flight delays that are coming next week or expected for next week. jeff flock following that story at o'hare international air board in chicago. jeff, what is the story? >> they say the government could stop this if it wanted to but they're using it as a political football. look at this for example. this is weather day. see all the yellow? those are all delayed flights. this is typical weather day. they say that will be like that every day f
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
of the larger faith community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the house? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conse
. how do you see the regulatory environment playing out? and how are you going to improve margins in this scenario? >> actually, my margins improved by 140 basis points over the quarter. so we had a record margin for the first quarter. so over a 40% margin. i was asked specifically, can our margins even improve more, and i said, well, we have a lot of pressures on regulatory issues. we're reinvesting in our company by hiring more people. so i was just being cautionary. but to answer your question, our margins have had improved year after year. they're going to improve from 2012 into 2013. i believe our business model will allow margins to improve, despite, despite, we're spending at more money on lawyers, spending a lot more time working with our regulators. and i think this is just the cost of doing business moving forward. >> we'll leave it there. larry, always wonderful to have you on the program. thanks so much for your time. >> thanks, maria. >> larry fink, black rock. we have a market up 112 points. we are still waiting on answers coming out of boston in terms of suspects. w
and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the realm, but without a big downturn in data or a big change in monetary policy expectations, i think it will be relative tame. >> what have you thought of the earnings so far this season? >> they've been modestly disappointing. we got some news today about corporate business jet appetite that was a little bit disappointing. but then look at the fed beige book report today, where they saw their seeing slightly impr
-term, but in this environment, where sentiment, we've got unusually bearish quickly. we've got more weakness in store. >> so you would wait. this isn't necessarily an entry point for you, yet? >> no, if i had cash on the sidelines, pretty much at the close of today, the average stock in the s&p 500 was off about 7% from its 52-week high. the average technology stock, 11% from its 52-week high, if we get another 3% to 5% down in stocks, then i think that cash on the sidelines should be absolutely put to work, because the next two or three years still bodes quite well for the stock market relative to most other asset classes. >> i may have to break in momentarily when those american express earnings come out. but first, jerry webben, let me ask you, the fear has been this week with news out of china, some of the economic data that we've gotten here, that maybe the global growth rate is slowing down. do you sense that at all? >> i think, yes, both in the u.s. and in china, we've seen some slowness in the emerging markets and europe remains extremely weak, but you've got to look at those growth areas in the u.s. wi
on the environment, people in the area, that sort of thing. >> scott, real quick, i know when you were talking to what you believe is the owner's son there, he said we simply don't know what happened. obviously, about the blast they have no idea what happened. but did he give you any indication at all why firefighters were there in the first place? because obviously there had been a fire there burning for some time. >> he did not seem to know the details on that. he just indicated that he knew that firefighters had responded, you know, there to the plant for some reason. and as far as he knew, they were the only people who would have been in there at the time that the explosion happened. >> i'm just curious, shock, did he seem shaken or upset at this point? >> he did. there was certainly an urgency to his voice, brian. i would say that. >> scott friedman, our investigative reporter, already on the case tonight. scott, i know you'll be working this tomorrow. thanks for your help tonight. we appreciate it. >> all right. as we take another look at some of the images that have been coming in tonig
in this environment. how do you feel about that? it's a double-edged sword, right? >> yeah, michelle, it is. so we actually make more money when rates are higher, so we'd like to see rates higher, particularly, a positive-sloping yield curve. you know, the fed has a strong view in consensus that rates need to stay low. i'm not generally in that camp. i think the early stages of qe were probably good. i think it's very debatable now whether it's doing any good or not. i personally think the economy trying to find its own natural structural, level of stabilization, and it's going to do that at its own pace, with or without qe. a lot of people disagree with that. but i think it's about confidence, not about how much qe we have. >> mr. king, appreciate your time, sir. thanks for joining us today. >> thank you very much. have a good day. >> great to have you on. >>> all right, stunning and frightening. just two terms to describe video that captures the situation that we saw in texas. >> yeah, we're going to go live to the blast scene for the latest developments on this horrible tragedy when we come bac
that come from conflict situations come into peaceful environments, and all of a sudden, and they're not given appropriate psychological pair, can also have enormous problems assimilating in a very different culture. >> and in terms of these two individuals living in cambridge, massachusetts, having come from chechnya, any thoughts there, why cambridge? why they've been living here together for so many years? why they chose boston? >> well, i think on the east coast that there is a burgeoning, it's by no means as large as europe, of course, the largest population of chechen is in austria, but i think there is a growing group of people along the east coast, in d.c., and in new york, and in boston, and clearly, chechens are also russian speaking, so there is, obviously, a large contingent of russian-speaking people also in boston. and from how i understand it, it seems as though their uncle was already here in the united states, and i think that they had other friends who could help them to settle into the country, and to assimilate, so, often, you choose a place precisely because y
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower cost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue, costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and prefunding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make up the entire loss this year. >> the fedex contra
of the slow to modest growth environment. interest rates we think will stay pretty low. that overall is a reasonably attractive back drop for companies to deliver okay earnings growth. and so we can take earnings disappointments as long as it's minor. but as you say, it is a gdp and an earnings cliff, then we return to late '07/'08 type markets. we don't think it's going to happen, though. >> jonathan, it's ross here. what would you describe as okay earnings growth? >> well, i mean, okay in the context of the last six to nine months has been earnings estimates coming down week after week after week after week. the aggregate impact of that, though, is that european earnings growth expectations for 2012, remember those numbers are not finalized until we see the full years coming in the first part of this year. analyst expectations started last year around plus 10% and then our minus 3%. that's quite a big shift down when you put that into context of what we saw in 2008 where the earnings estimates went from plus 20 to minus 50%. so we've really seen in the context of previously earning
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
to celebrate that in a family environment in a fun way. other people look at us differently. they look at patriotism as their enemy. they look at inon sense americans as targets. we are in a war here and we've got to deal with it accordingly. >> mayor, if you had to pinpoint some of issues, you bring up some of the difficulties in some of the ways that americans have to grapple with the idea of losing freedom, but also the idea of making sure that you feel secure in any of these areas. we talked to an analyst this morning who pointed out that the largest population of north secaucus former residents have to be in watertown, massachusetts, this is where this is all taking out and you live in a town that's a melting pot and has been for a long time. does that make it more difficult? >> boston area diversity has always been its strength, a large, young, student population, many from foreign countries have been our strength over the past years, over the past many years, but today we are vulnerable from international terrorist organizations that come into our city, come into our area and we
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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